Lure of the Land

A fresh crop of gentleman (and woman) farmers with a shared passion for connecting with the land is sprouting up around Connecticut



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≈ RED BEE APIARY ≈
Weston


LA DOLCE VITA  “Honey sommelier” and beekeeper Marina Marchese knows something about the sweet life. This former product designer and graduate of The School of Visual Arts in New York City discovered her true calling 11 years ago when she fell in love with bees while touring a neighbor’s beehives. Turning her back on the corporate world, Marina created a buzz in Weston when she started harvesting her own artisanal honey. While working out of several red cottages (the former home of prima ballerina and author Gelsey Kirkland), the queen bee wrote a book on the subject (Honeybee: Lessons from an Accidental Beekeeper) and now sells honey, Rossape (Italian for “red bee”) honey-based beauty products, encaustic paintings and beeswax candles. Things have really taken off recently. “I’ve seen a lot more interest in honey due to the green movement and people paying attention to where their food comes from,” says Marina. “They’re looking at honey in a different way—not just as a condiment, but as an agricultural product. It’s an exciting time to be associated with food and farms.” Newest endeavor: honey tastings at the apiary. This summer look for more “Talk, Tour and Taste” events (initiated by bloggers at fairfieldgreenfoodguide.com and ctbites.com, who last year promised to fill the seats…and then did). 

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