Architecture Innovator Winners

Contemporary to classic architecture dominates the landscape in Connecticut.



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PHOTOGRAPHS BY DURSTON SAYLOR

Winner

Through a unified design concept, the architect successfully transforms a 1950s brick Colonial into a simple, functional and exquisitely beautiful home

In the summer of 2008, a mathematician and a marketer hired Joeb Moore to completely reconfigure their New Canaan house. He took it from something that Moore describes as “quite eclectic and ordinary” (a seemingly oxymoronic description that makes sense against the backdrop of the uninspired pastiche, inconsistent brick-and-clapboard siding, and confusing entry points the couple’s existing house featured) to something “that’s much more unified in terms of its relationship to landscape, to program, and to architecture.” Moore, a devout conceptualist who slips deep historical and theoretical thought into all of his work, considered the project in three parts: interior, architectural shell, and landscape.

Rather than tear it all down, the architects were able to “encapsulate the existing house completely,” as Moore explains. They took down every single wall, save for a single interior box that became a teak-lined sitting room on the interior and a series of white gallery-style walls (the couple are avid collectors) on the exterior. That box then became the center point for the collection of living areas that Moore calls “a pinwheel around this grounded teak jewel box,” all enclosed in an entirely new exterior. On the back, eight-foot windows delicately framed by dark wood beams open the house onto a winding expanse of nature (and bring the outside in). While on the front, a crisp yet materially rich combination of white stucco and teak introduces the interior aesthetic to come.

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