Museum Must Sees

Gallery goers have some great new choices—a cluster of pods overlooking Central Park, a beer garden in the New York Historical Society and a wealth of women's art at the National Academy.





The sixteen "pods" of Cloud City installed on the Metropolitan Museum's roof garden terrace.

CLOUDY-DAYS

Something truly wondrous has been installed for the summer in the Metropolitan Museum's roof garden.  Artist Tomas Saraceno has named it "Cloud City," but that doesn't really describe the juxtaposition of pods, mirrors, wires, stairs and clear plastic-panels that create a lumpy environment perched on the terrace like some kind of alien space station.

So long as it isn’t raining a restricted number of visitors wearing rubber soled shoes are allowed to climb inside for a vertigo experience. In every direction disorienting jumbled angles reflect views of the park, mirror images of your own face, and cityscapes, which appear to lie beneath your feet.

While the 16 pods were under construction, Saraceno says, "you'd ask the guy next to you to hand you the hammer and he'd turn out to be way over on the other side of the structure."
Provoking multiple questions about the here and now, truth and reality, heaven and hell, the intriguing work will be dismantled on November 4th and shipped elsewhere, so find an excuse to go to the Met and sample a new way to experience the world.
www.metmuseum.org
 

OCTOBERFEST ALL SUMMER

Yes, really, they've set up a beer hall in the New York Historical Society. Visitors pass through the exhibits of "Beer Here: Brewing New York's History" learning that colonists, adults and children consumed beer as a healthier alternative to plain water which was not boiled and didn't include the antimicrobial prevention of hops.  After seeing devices for cutting hops and harvesting ice (notably in Rockland Lake), after learning how .5% "near-beer" helped the beverage survive prohibition, after discovering how Crown caps led to bottling efficiency, after seeing competitions for vintage "Miss Reingolds," visitors wind up at long bar tables with bowls of pretzels for an actual in-museum beer tasting.

Through the summer, 15 different brewers will take turns presenting their concoctions in half-hour tastings at 2 p.m. and 4 p.m. Details on beer hall hours, tastings and for information on Beer Appreciation Night held on July 10th visit their website.
www.nyhistory.org
 

 Miss Rheingold posters are featured in the New-York Historical Society's exhibit "Beer Here."

 



The National Academy's Salon Gallery features work of Academicians spanning 150 years.
(Photo is by Glenn Castello)


NATIONAL ACADEMY EXTRAVAGANZA

Titled "Women's Work" and encompassing graphic works by Mary Cassatt, sculptures by 19th and 20th century women, a collection of realist paintings by Colleen Browning, the "Big Daddy Series" of protest paintings by May Stevens and recent gifts by 30 contemporary women artists, the National Academy has mounted a multi-faceted series of exhibits aimed at broadening the perceptions and knowledge of art work by American women.

Active in the Academy since its 1825 founding, women artists have participated as academicians, exhibitors, students and instructors. Exhibits have been illustrating their achievements for over 100 years.

In addition a separate exhibition, "White: The Anatomy of a Color" explores the infinite properties of that tone.  Finally, all four walls of the distinguished building's long gallery is choc a bloc with 120 works by Whistler, Wyeth, Homer, the second rotation of a salon-style installation spanning the work and diversity of Academy artists in the years 1820-1970.
www.nationalacademy.org

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