Art and Hope

The Palm Beach Jewelry, Art & Antiques Show: Crowds of visitors shop and browse at a record-setting art show in Palm Beach.





Shoppers browse among the treasures at the Palm Beach Jewelry, Art & Antique Show

This year’s Palm Beach Jewelry, Art & Antique Show, its ninth annual, featured new dimensions including a champagne opening reception, show house rooms and an afternoon English high tea. Charity sponsor Hope for Depression Research Foundation even partnered with the Palm Beach Show Group to present a show of superlatives. After the opening crowd of over 6,000 guests, the show had strong attendance. Several of the 170 exhibitors reported strong sales of wares from cultured pearl chokers to tortoise shell boxes, Chinese Imari porcelain, Danish silver and marine oil paintings.


Overview of the booths at the Palm Beach Jewelry, Art & Antique Show

Representing Connecticut in the maze of attractive booths were Dawn Hill Antiques, who brought 18th- and 19th-century Swedish painted furniture and decorative objects from its New Preston Shop, and G. Sergeant Antiques who showcased great classics. The Woodbury dealer had a double-size booth featuring an important carved stone William Kent console table with its original veneered Travertino Colorato marble top.


Twin tall case clocks were among the painted Swedish wares offered by New Preston's Dawn Hill Antiques


From Woodbury, G. Sergeant Antiques brought a selection of classic antiques

Shoppers also had the opportunity to buy a framed Abraham Lincoln signature among the offerings at LionHeart Autographs from New York, luscious cultured pearls from Yvel, and recycled bags from Hermes and Chanel at Only Authentics. Familiar from the last Palm Beach Show, the dramatic "14 Seconds" graphic Joan Miro created is still seeking a home. It is said to have been created in just that much time on a television show.

pictured to the left: Miro is said to have created this work as a challenge on a live television show


Popular Chanel and Birkin bags offered by Only Authentics

Five noted firms created room settings for the Hope Designer Showcase to illustrate the successful juxtaposition of antique and contemporary pieces. Geoffrey Bradfield, Bruce Bierman, Campion Platt, Aman and Meeks incorporated pieces from exhibitors. Scott Snyder's living room vignette was done up in the gray and yellow signature colors of the charity partner Hope for Depression Research Foundation.


One of five showhouse rooms created for the antique show, Scott Snyder designed this room inspired by the yellow and gray signature color scheme of the Hope for Depression Research Foundation.

Also wearing yellow and gray was the dynamic HDRF founder Audrey Gruss who organized a series of lectures and activities for supporters of the foundation, which funds research toward the treatment of depression. Noting that almost 20 percent of people in creative professions are susceptible to some form of emotional imbalance, Gruss cited the group's synergy in supporting the arts.

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